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Recent Submissions

Now showing 1 - 5 of 12
  • Publication
    The Interpreters' Newsletter n. 21/2016. Interpreting and interpreters throughout history
    (EUT Edizioni Università di Trieste, 2016)
    Founded in 1988 as the first journal on Interpreting Studies, The Interpreters’ Newsletter publishes contributions covering theoretical and practical aspects of interpreting.
      514  3740
  • Publication
    Book reviews
    (EUT Edizioni Università di Trieste, 2016)
    Falbo, Caterina
    ;
    Riccardi, Alessandra
    ;
    Turner, Graham H.
    ;
    Gile, Daniel
      510  494
  • Publication
    Going back to Ancient Egypt: were the Princes of Elephantine really ‘overseers of dragomans’?
    (EUT Edizioni Università di Trieste, 2016)
    Falbo, Caterina
    Among the different titles the Princes of Elephantine had, that of “overseers of dragomans” has drawn the attention of researchers in the history of interpretation. This title has always appeared as a recognition of the status and importance interpreters enjoyed in Ancient Egypt. The denomination “overseer of dragomans” is the translation that Sir Alan Gardiner proposed of inscriptions found in different regions of Ancient Egypt, among which the island of Elephantine. In 1960, Goedicke criticised Gardiner’s translation on the basis of historical and linguistic reasons. His objections, unknown to the Interpreting Studies community until today, seem to deny the role of the Princes of Elephantine as “overseers of dragomans”.
      835  1016
  • Publication
    Contributors
    (EUT Edizioni Università di Trieste, 2016)
      284  303
  • Publication
    Ruston: the foundational case for interpreting with deaf parties in Anglo-American courtrooms
    (EUT Edizioni Università di Trieste, 2016)
    Leahy, Anne M.
    Though not the first legal matter to admit a sworn signed language interpreter, this precedent-setting case that codified early protocols of courtroom interpreting for deaf parties under common law in Great Britain and the United States was heard in the London Central Criminal Court in 1786. During a larceny trial, a woman endured such an adversarial voir dire process, that it cleared the procedural hurdles of that day to admit her deaf brother as a witness for the prosecution, and she was permitted to act as his interpreter. Supported by the sitting justice, her insightful answers to a belligerent defense counsel, and nuanced interpreting of witness testimony elevated the citation into the Anglo-American legal lexicon as “Ruston’s Case.” Named as such for the deaf witness and not the defendant, it has influenced centuries of legal signed language interpreting case law and practice.
      1163  2410