Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10077/10073
Title: Psychological reaction to life’s traumas: well-being and trauma among college nursing students
Authors: Rebulla, Elena
Keywords: traumaPTSD
Issue Date: 14-Apr-2014
Publisher: Università degli studi di Trieste
Abstract: The present study examined the relationship between symptoms of post-traumatic stress, resilience, and growth in undergraduate students attending the University of South Florida, College of Nursing, in Tampa. Some trauma survivors will demonstrate negative reactions to trauma, some will not demonstrate any post-trauma symptoms, while some individuals will show positive reactions. This study investigated how, in a sample of nursing students, the psychological factors associated with adverse reactions, resiliency, and post-traumatic growth occur. The identification of these factors within a nursing population can be used to better understand these reactions as well as aid in training nurses to improve their role as health care providers. The relationships among three major areas of interest were investigated: negative reactions, resilience, and growth, using the following standardized scales and their subscales, as well as looking at moderators that may impact on these relationships. This study used on-line survey methodology. Surveys included Demographic information, Traumatic Event Questionnaire (TEQ), Post-Traumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI), Response to Stressful Experience Scale (RSES), PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C), Self-Compassion Scale (SCS), Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS), and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). The study population consisted of 115 undergraduate students. PCL-C total scores were significantly positively correlated with CES-D. Higher PCL-C scores were associated with higher CES-D scores. PCL-C scores were significantly negatively associated with other instrument scores such as PTGI and RSES. A hierarchical regression model was used to model the association of depression, self-compassion, growth, resilience, and social support on post-traumatic stress. The overall model significantly predicted PCL symptoms and explained a significant proportion of variance. Depression was the largest significant predictor of post-traumatic stress. Depression also explained a significant proportion of variance in post-traumatic stress. A hierarchical regression model was used to model the association of resilience, PCL-C, self-compassion, social support and depression on post-traumatic growth. The overall model significantly predicted post-traumatic growth and explained a significant proportion of variance. Resilience was the largest significant predictor of post-traumatic growth. Resilience also explained a significant proportion of variance in post-traumatic stress. A hierarchical regression model was used to model the association of post-traumatic growth, depression, PCL-C, self-compassion, and social support on resilience. The overall model significantly predicted resilience and explained a significant proportion of variance. Post-traumatic growth was the largest significant predictor of resilience. Post-traumatic growth also explained a significant proportion of variance in resilience. This study supports previous notions that psychological distress and growth can coexist and are indeed related. Helping trauma survivors develop self- compassion and acceptance may prove to be of great benefit in finding positive outcome from life’s traumas'. Findings may guide interventions with other populations who experience PTSD and other post trauma reactions.
Description: 2012/2013
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10077/10073
NBN: urn:nbn:it:units-12288
Appears in Collections:Scienze storiche, filosofiche, pedagogiche e psicologiche

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