The Interpreters' Newsletter n. 20 - 2015

CONTENTS / SOMMARIO

Dal Fovo Eugenia, Niemants Natacha

Editorial

Dal Fovo Eugenia, Niemants Natacha

Studying Dialogue Interpreting: an Introduction

Nartowska Karolina

The role of the court interpreter: a powerless or powerful participant in criminal proceedings?

Gallez Emmanuelle

“Vous voulez m’embrasser?” Impolitesse et “face-work” en interprétation judiciaire

Baraldi Claudio

Dialogue interpreting in an Italian immigrant support centre: mediating constructions of social conditions

Gavioli Laura

Negotiating territories of knowledge: on interpreting talk in guided tours

Sandrelli Annalisa

‘And maybe you can translate also what I say’: interpreters in football press conferences

Vargas-Urpi Mireia

Dialogue interpreting in multi-party encounters: two examples from educational settings

Farini Federico

Talking emotions in multilingual healthcare settings. A qualitative study of interpreter-mediated interaction in Italian hospitals

Merlini Raffaela, Gatti Mariadele

Empathy in healthcare interpreting: going beyond the notion of role

Ticca Anna Claudia, Traverso Véronique

La bonne information: quand les interprètes corrigent les réponses du patient dans la consultation médicale

Martínez-Gómez Aída

Invisible, visible or everywhere in between? Perceptions and actual behaviors of non-professional interpreters and interpreting users

Salaets Heidi, De Pooter An-Katrien

The cooperation between the Waterway Police and the legal interpreters in the legal district of Antwerp: a qualitative research into best practices

Viljanmaa Anu

Two modes of practice in dialogue-interpreter training: adding live practice in the interpreting booth alongside traditional face-to-face training

Browse

Recent Submissions

Now showing 1 - 5 of 15
  • Publication
    Studying Dialogue Interpreting: an Introduction
    (EUT Edizioni Università di Trieste, 2016-04-12)
    Dal Fovo, Eugenia
    ;
    Niemants, Natacha
      1301  1699
  • Publication
    The Interpreters' Newsletter n. 20/2015. Dialogue Interpreting
    (EUT Edizioni Università di Trieste, 2015)
    Founded in 1988 as the first journal on Interpreting Studies, The Interpreters’ Newsletter publishes contributions covering theoretical and practical aspects of interpreting.
      980  11419
  • Publication
    Two modes of practice in dialogue-interpreter training: adding live practice in the interpreting booth alongside traditional face-to-face training
    (2015-12-18)
    Viljanmaa, Anu
    The article explores students’ views and thoughts on two distinct ways of training students in dialogue interpreting (DI) by looking at a combination of the more traditional method of face-to-face training (which utilises simulated real-life DI situations in a classroom environment) with a ‘semi remote’ method involving simultaneous-interpreting booths used for consecutive DI. At the University of Tampere, DI is a mandatory course for all students of translation and interpreting at BA level. On the basis of two semi-structured interviews with senior DI teachers and the author’s experience in teaching DI, a questionnaire was created and a survey conducted among DI students focusing on students’ views of practising DI in the booth alongside traditional in-classroom practice. The survey focused on learning (sub)skills involved in DI and on comparing the two training methods used in the course. The findings indicate that using in-booth practice as an additional training method can actually serve students even better than DI teachers had initially expected.
      1212  756
  • Publication
    The cooperation between the Waterway Police and the legal interpreters in the legal district of Antwerp: a qualitative research into best practices
    (2015-12-18)
    Salaets, Heidi
    ;
    De Pooter, An-Katrien
    In spite of a growing interest in the statute and role relating to legal interpreters (LIs) in research and practice, there still is no standard legal statute for LIs in Belgium. Subsequently, this paper aims to investigate how the "Scheepvaartpolitie" (The Waterway Police) – by definition a division that is confronted with multilingual issues in ports – and LIs cooperate in the legal district of Antwerp. The literature review and the preliminary phase of this research focus on the work environment of the police and the interpreters in this area. To gain an in-depth view of the way the Waterway Police and LIs work together, we have interviewed ten members of the Waterway Police and five legal interpreters who were trained at the KU Leuven, Antwerp campus (former Lessius UC). The answers and remarks of both parties have shown that there is indeed cooperation, but it does not always run that smoothly. According to the Waterway Police this is mainly due to the non-user-friendly registers that are used to recruit interpreters. According to the interpreters, there is a lack of adequate training for the police in interpretermediated encounters.
      902  668
  • Publication
    Invisible, visible or everywhere in between? Perceptions and actual behaviors of non-professional interpreters and interpreting users
    (2015-12-18)
    Martínez-Gómez, Aída
    The notion of the invisible interpreter, once – and for long – an uncontested principle, has recently started to be deconstructed in favour of the image of the interpreter as an active third party in the interaction. This study aims to contribute to this process through an analysis of interpreter visibility in a prison setting using a corpus of 19 interpreted interviews and pre-interview surveys. It describes the self-perceptions of non-professional interpreters and the expectations of interpreting users about the interpreter role, and contrasts these with actual behaviours during the interpreted event. Results indicate that these interpreters tend to perceive themselves as less visible than they in fact are and that interpreters’ visibility in actual interaction is negotiated by all parties through conversational acceptance and rejection mechanisms.
      2093  2748