Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10077/12563
Title: San Giorgio Maggiore a Venezia: la chiesa tardo-medievale e il coro del 1550
Authors: Bisson, Massimo
Issue Date: 21-Apr-2016
Publisher: EUT Edizioni Università di Trieste
Source: Massimo Bisson, "San Giorgio Maggiore a Venezia: la chiesa tardo-medievale e il coro del 1550", in: AFAT 33, EUT Edizioni Università di Trieste, 2014, pp. 11-38
Series/Report no.: AFAT
33
Abstract: Scholars have hitherto given little attention to the lost late-medieval Benedictine church of San Giorgio Maggiore in Venice. The main documentary sources (a 1550-51 book of accounts and a slightly later ceremonial) have only been partially studied, while a superficial interpretation of them led scholars to gross misunderstandings. A re-examination of the documents allows us to formulate a new proposal for the reconstruction of the abbey church and, in particular, of the choirs and the presbytery. The latter had a rather complex arrangement, similar to that of the main chapel of St. Mark; this parallelism is even more significant if we consider the annual doge’s visits to the monastery on the feast of St. Stephen. The main chapel restoration carried out in the mid 16th century could be interpreted as the first stage of an architectural renovation that could be extended to all the medieval church, following the example of Giulio Romano’s intervention in the sister abbey church of San Benedetto Po, near Mantua (1540s). The following ambitious project of a new monumental church by Palladio, however, just fifteen years later, frustrated this hypothetical original plan.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10077/12563
ISSN: 1827-269X
Appears in Collections:AFAT 33

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