Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10077/12908
Title: Terenzia, una matrona in domo et in re publica agens
Authors: Buonopane, Alfredo
Issue Date: 28-Jun-2016
Publisher: EUT Edizioni Università di Trieste
Source: Alfredo Buonopane, "Terenzia, una matrona in domo et in re publica agens" in: Francesca Cenerini e Francesca Rohr Vio (a cura di), "Matronae in domo et in re publica agentes - spazi e occasioni dell'azione femminile nel mondo romano tra tarda repubblica e primo impero", Trieste, EUT Edizioni Università di Trieste, 2016, pp. 51-64
Series/Report no.: Polymnia. Collana di Scienze dell'Antichità. Studi di Storia romana
5
Abstract: 
Terentia, the wife of Cicero, is one of several women dramatically involved in their
husbands’ political affairs during the years of civil wars. Many of Cicero letters, addressed
both to her both to Atticus, give us a vivid picture of a matrona who, left alone
in Rome with two sons, among many difficulties of all kinds, must with courage and
fortitude, agere in domo to handle all the problems of everyday life, exacerbated by a lot
of financial difficulties and also by the not easy relations with the son in law Quintus or
the engagement of their daughter Tullia with Dolabella, but must also agere in re publica
to urge political and economic support for her husband and to solve intricate property
questions, as the fictional liberation of slaves or the restitution of the land on which
stood her house.
Type: Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10077/12908
ISBN: 978-88-8303-753-5
eISBN: 978-88-8303-754-2
Appears in Collections:05. Matronae in domo et in re publica agentes

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