Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10077/28390
Title: Mon corps, mon capital. La bioéconomie et les nouvelles frontières du corps humain
Authors: Lafontaine, Céline
Keywords: Bodybioeconomybiocitizenshiphealthcapitalbiomedicalization
Issue Date: 2019
Publisher: EUT Edizioni Università di Trieste
Source: Lafontaine, Céline , ""Mon corps, mon capital. La bioéconomie et les nouvelles frontières du corps humain"", in "Etica & Politica / Ethics & Politics (2019) XXI/2", Trieste, EUT Edizioni Università di Trieste, 2019, pp. 77-88
Journal: Etica & Politica / Ethics & Politics 
Abstract: 
In a world tainted by the cult of perfect health and the biomedicalization of identity, the value
attributed to individual life appears to come increasingly from individuals’ capacity to maintain—
and even enhance—their biological “capital.” The valorization of “life itself” in the bioeconomy
fosters a representation of the body as capital. Stemming from the notion of human capital
developed by Gary Becker, the conception of the body as capital is dissociable from the
bioeconomy, the ultimate stage of globalized capitalism. Not only does the bioeconomy model
dictate all neoliberal politics in innovation and research implemented since the early 1980s, it is
redefining the very foundations of citizenship. Maintaining and extending health is therefore
seen as an investment that increases individuals’ social “value.” This concept of the body as
capital is evident in the development of private umbilical cord blood stem cell banks that
encourage parents to invest in their children’s biological capital. It also shows up in the
phenomenon of medical tourism. This article presents a theoretical analysis of the concept of
body capital via two phenomena: the development of private cord blood banks, medical tourism,
and translational medicine.In a world tainted by the cult of perfect health and the biomedicalization of identity, the value
attributed to individual life appears to come increasingly from individuals’ capacity to maintain—
and even enhance—their biological “capital.” The valorization of “life itself” in the bioeconomy
fosters a representation of the body as capital. Stemming from the notion of human capital
developed by Gary Becker, the conception of the body as capital is dissociable from the
bioeconomy, the ultimate stage of globalized capitalism. Not only does the bioeconomy model
dictate all neoliberal politics in innovation and research implemented since the early 1980s, it is
redefining the very foundations of citizenship. Maintaining and extending health is therefore
seen as an investment that increases individuals’ social “value.” This concept of the body as
capital is evident in the development of private umbilical cord blood stem cell banks that
encourage parents to invest in their children’s biological capital. It also shows up in the
phenomenon of medical tourism. This article presents a theoretical analysis of the concept of
body capital via two phenomena: the development of private cord blood banks, medical tourism,
and translational medicine.In a world tainted by the cult of perfect health and the biomedicalization of identity, the value
attributed to individual life appears to come increasingly from individuals’ capacity to maintain—
and even enhance—their biological “capital.” The valorization of “life itself” in the bioeconomy
fosters a representation of the body as capital. Stemming from the notion of human capital
developed by Gary Becker, the conception of the body as capital is dissociable from the
bioeconomy, the ultimate stage of globalized capitalism. Not only does the bioeconomy model
dictate all neoliberal politics in innovation and research implemented since the early 1980s, it is
redefining the very foundations of citizenship. Maintaining and extending health is therefore
seen as an investment that increases individuals’ social “value.” This concept of the body as
capital is evident in the development of private umbilical cord blood stem cell banks that
encourage parents to invest in their children’s biological capital. It also shows up in the
phenomenon of medical tourism. This article presents a theoretical analysis of the concept of
body capital via two phenomena: the development of private cord blood banks, medical tourism,
and translational medicine.
Type: Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10077/28390
ISSN: 1825-5167
DOI: 10.13137/1825-5167/28390
Rights: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internazionale
Appears in Collections:Etica & Politica / Ethics & Politics (2019) XXI/2

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
5_EP2019_2.pdf132.56 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open
Show full item record


CORE Recommender

Page view(s)

228
checked on Aug 16, 2022

Download(s)

102
checked on Aug 16, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric

Altmetric


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons