European Transport / Trasporti Europei (2012) 50/XVII

Permanent URI for this collection

CONTENTS

Special issue on: Freight transport analysis: new trends and methodologies. Guest Editors: Edoardo Marcucci and Sean Puckett

Edoardo Marcucci, Sean Puckett
Freight transport analysis: new trends and methodologies. Introduction

Sean M. Puckett, John M. Rose, Stuart Bain
Modelling heterogeneity in scale directly: implications for estimates of influence in freight decision-making groups

Gerard de Jong
Application of experimental economics in transport and logistics

Lucia Rotaris, Romeo Danielis, Igor Sarman, Edoardo Marcucci
Testing for nonlinearity in the choice of a freight transport service

Adriano Alessandrini, Paolo Delle Site., Francesco Filippi, Marco Valerio Salucci
Using rail to make urban freight distribution more sustainable

Jesus Gonzalez-Feliu, Christian Ambrosini, Jean-Louis Routhier.
New trends on urban goods movement modelling: proximity delivery versus shopping trips

Agostino Nuzzolo, Umberto Crisalli, Antonio Comi
A trip chain order model for simulating urban freight restocking

Browse

Recent Submissions

Now showing 1 - 5 of 6
  • Publication
    New trends on urban goods movement modelling: proximity delivery versus shopping trips
    (2012)
    Gonzalez Feliu, Jesus
    ;
    Ambrosini, Christian
    ;
    Routhier, Jean-Louis
    In this paper, a modelling framework to complete the recent scientific works on urban goods modelling is proposed. More precisely, we introduce a substitution procedure that estimates the number of trips and the corresponding travelled distances for shopping drive, home delivery and reception points' strategies. Moreover, an appraisal of scenarios is proposed in order to study how these three new forms of proximity delivery services impact on the overall urban goods movement distribution. Starting from four extreme situations, we introduce more realistic scenarios in order to find a suitable combination of delivery strategies. All the scenarios are simulated using the proposed framework, and the main traffic issues related to e-commerce distribution channel are discussed. The best realistic combination promotes the joint usage of home deliveries and proximity reception points and allows a reduction of about 13% of the road occupancy rates in urban areas.
      1478  3733
  • Publication
    Using rail to make urban freight distribution more sustainable
    (2012)
    Alessandrini, Adriano
    ;
    Delle Site, Paolo
    ;
    Filippi, Francesco
    ;
    Salucci, Marco Valerio
    Rail is today a minimally used modality in urban freight distribution. To reap the benefits of this more sustainable transport mode a few experiences in Europe have attempted to introduce innovative freight distribution schemes where rail is used. One of such schemes uses rail for the urban penetration leg. After having been consolidated in a centre located outside the urban area, goods are transported by shuttle trains to a centre located inside the central area (the multi-modal urban distribution centre – MUDC) and there are transferred to low-pollution road vehicles to reach their final destination. Other schemes use tramways. The paper provides a review of rail-based schemes which have been introduced in European cities. An in-depth assessment is provided of the scheme based on the use of a MUDC. The case study relates to the distribution of fish food in Rome. The environmental and energy benefits obtainable from the shift from the current road-only scheme to the MUDC scheme are estimated in physical and monetary units. An estimate is provided of the maximum public contribution that would still make the scheme beneficial for society as a whole, obtained as the difference between the social costs of the road-only scheme and those of the MUDC scheme. Also, an assessment is provided of the profitability of the scheme from the operators‟ viewpoint.
      1506  4987
  • Publication
    Testing for nonlinearity in the choice of a freight transport service
    (2012)
    Rotaris, Lucia
    ;
    Danielis, Romeo
    ;
    Sarman, Igor
    ;
    Marcucci, Edoardo
    Manufacturing firms buy transport services with the aim of minimizing their total logistics cost. There is a large amount of literature analyzing how shippers value the various characteristics of a transport service, mostly performed by collecting stated-preference data and estimating discrete choice models. Most of the empirical studies specify the deterministic part of the utility functions as linear in the observed attributes. This implicitly constrains the characteristics of the analyzed transport service to be perfect substitutes, and to have a constant substitutability ratio. Such an assumption is inconsistent with the standard microeconomic theory, typically assuming inputs’ decreasing marginal productivity, and may not be realistic. The paper tests the linearity assumption for freight rate, travel time, probability of having damaged and lost freight, frequency, flexibility, mode and punctuality on a sample of Italian small- and medium-sized manufacturing enterprises (SME). Our findings suggest that the linearity-in-the-attributes assumption should be rejected and that the marginal impact on the utility-of-profit of the attributes is not constant. More specifically travel time and freight rate produce decreasing marginal reductions of the utility-of-profit; while safety (percentage of not damaged or lost shipments) and punctuality (percentage of shipments on time) are responsible for increasing marginal contributions to the utility-of-profit. The substitutability ratios between (a) freight rate and loss and damage, (b) freight rate and travel time, (c) freight rate and punctuality, (d) travel time and damage and loss and (e) travel time and punctuality are estimated and found not constant. Finally, it is found that the willingness to pay for the qualitative attributes obtained with a linearly specified model tend to be overestimated.
      1425  2286
  • Publication
    Application of experimental economics in transport and logistics
    (2012)
    de Jong, Gerard
    There is scope for applying experimental economics in transport and logistics analysis. Experimental economics is a set of techniques for gathering (and analysing) data by inducing people (through specific rewards) to act as economic agents and observing the choices they then make in experimental situations. These experiments often involve interactions between the respondents, possibly in a market setting, and this can be applied in transport to study for instance shipper – carrier interaction. Various subfields of experimental economics that might be relevant for transport and logistics research are described. We also review past applications of experimental economics in transport and logistics and work out some ideas for future applications.
      1297  2191
  • Publication
    Modelling heterogeneity in scale directly: implications for estimates of influence in freight decision-making groups
    (2012)
    Puckett, Sean M.
    ;
    Rose, John M.
    ;
    Bain, Stuart
    The state of practice in the modelling of heterogeneous preferences does not separate the effects of scale from estimated mean and standard deviation preference measures. This restriction could lead to divergent behavioural implications relative to a flexible modelling structure that accounts for scale effects independently of estimated distributions of preference measures. The generalised multinomial logit (GMNL) model is such an econometric tool, enabling the analyst to identify the role that scale plays in impacting estimated sample mean and standard deviation preference measures, including confirming whether the appropriate model form approaches standard cases such as mixed logit. The GMNL model is applied in this paper to compare the behavioural implications of the minimum information group inference (MIGI) model within a study of interdependent road freight stakeholders in Sydney, Australia. MIGI estimates within GMNL models are compared with extant mixed logit measures (see Hensher and Puckett, 2008) to confirm whether the implications of the restrictive (with respect to scale) mixed logit model are consistent to those from the more flexible GMNL model. The results confirm the overall implication that transporters appear to hold relative power over supply chain responses to variable road-user charges. However, the GMNL model identifies a broader range of potential group decision-making outcomes and a restricted set of attributes over which heterogeneity in group influence is found than the mixed logit model. Hence, this analysis offers evidence that failing to account for scale heterogeneity may result in inaccurate representations of the bargaining set, and the nature of preference heterogeneity, in general.
      1283  2406